Emerald Ash Borer Found In Oregon (First On West Coast); Potential To Destroy Large Numbers Of Trees Key To Salmon Habitat

October 6th, 2022

A small invasive beetle that has decimated ash groves in the Midwest was found in Oregon earlier this summer, the first to be found on the West Coast. When – not if – it spreads in Oregon, it has the potential to destroy large swaths of ash trees in forests and along streams located on the west side of the Cascade Mountains. The loss of the trees could impact salmon and steelhead in the Willamette Valley.

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Washington Implements Incident Command System To Battle Habitat-Destroying Invasive Green Crabs: 64,000 Removed This Year

June 23rd, 2022

Deployment of emergency measures to control invasive European green crabs on the Washington Coast and at sites within the Salish Sea is well underway, including the implementation of an Incident Command System to facilitate statewide coordination between various agencies, tribes, and partners.

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Report Details States’ Efforts In 2021 To Block Invasive Mussels From Gaining Foothold In Northwest; 162 Fouled Boats Stopped

May 6th, 2022

In the battle to block destructive zebra and quagga mussels from infesting Pacific Northwest waters, the four states at watercraft inspection stations in 2021 intercepted 55 more fouled boats than last year even though the number of total inspections were substantially less than in 2020.

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Suppression Of Northern Pike In Lake Roosevelt Showing Much Success; Goal Is To Reduce Population To ‘Almost Undetectable Levels’

February 17th, 2022

An effort by tribes, the state of Washington and federal agencies to suppress or eradicate invasive Northern Pike is bearing fruit in Lake Roosevelt, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, according to an update by biologists at this week’s meeting of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Fish and Wildlife Committee.

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European Green Crab Invasion In Washington Worsens: Researchers Using E-DNA To Contain, Prevent New Outbreaks

February 17th, 2022

European green crabs feast on shellfish, destroy marsh habitats by burrowing in the mud and obliterate valuable seagrass beds. The invasive species also reproduces quickly, making it a nightmare for wildlife managers seeking to control its spread in Washington’s marine waters.

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Montana Study Reveals How Invasive Species Over Time Disrupt Native Species’ Food Webs; Lake Trout Vs. Bull Trout

November 11th, 2021

Invasive species cause biodiversity loss and about $120 billion in annual damages in the U.S. alone. Despite plentiful evidence that invasive species can change food webs, how invaders disrupt food webs and native species over time has remained unclear.

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Future Bright For American Shad, Most Abundant Anadromous Fish In Columbia River Basin; Risks To Native Salmonids Unknown

October 28th, 2021

American shad, a non-native fish species introduced to the Columbia River basin in the late 1800s, has replaced salmon and steelhead as the most abundant anadromous fish in the basin – by a long shot – and, although there are a number of uncertainties, their abundance could be impacting salmon and steelhead recovery in the Columbia and Snake rivers, a recent report says.

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Find Invasive Species In Early Stages: E-DNA Being Used To Successfully Detect Unknown Incursions

June 3rd, 2021

Biologists led by the University of Iowa discovered the presence of the invasive New Zealand mud snail by detecting their DNA in waters they were inhabiting incognito. The researchers employed a technique called environmental DNA to reveal the snails' existence, showing the method can be used to detect and control new, unknown incursions by the snail and other invasive species.

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